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Weese's new accent pillows pack a graphic punch.

As the daughter of famed architect Harry Weese and design shop owner Kitty Baldwin, Marcia Weese spent her Chicago childhood immersed in modern design and surrounded by many midcentury legends—Charles and Ray Eames included. After formally training as a sculptor, painter, and printmaker, the Carbondale-based Weese has been an artist herself for the past 30 years, creating works on paper and gorgeous rug patterns—and now pillows—in her downvalley studio.

Though Weese just moved to Carbondale full time in late 2016, she’s long had strong ties to Aspen. The Weese family spent holidays in Aspen—her parents are among “an illustrious and hearty group of early modernist settlers who loved the mountains and skiing and who brought Aspen out of its ‘Quiet Years’”—soon buying a second home in the West End in the late 1960s.

Weese follows a personal mantra that interiors are “design, not decoration.” In 2006, she introduced her first collection of rugs, with designs inspired by the natural world as well as her deep roots in the modern aesthetic. The wool and silk rugs ($76 per square foot) are handwoven by Tibetan refugees in Nepal.

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Weese in her Carbondale studio. 

This May at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair in New York, she’ll launch her third collection of rugs, named Geo[metry], which is based on the concept of the grid as well as its dissolution to “imbue an unruffled order,” says Weese. The color scheme draws on a cool blue, gray, and white palette that’s “based on the quality of light at various times of day and night,” she adds. The four patterns will come in five background and six accent colors, as well as custom combinations.

New for 2017, Weese has added a line of vibrantly colored, hand-knotted silk and linen accent pillows ($375 each) to the fold. Also handmade in Nepal and geometrically inspired, the pillow collection was designed to complement the hues of the new rugs, though custom color commissions are also available. “For centuries, Tibetans have used pillows for meditation, ceremony, and comfort,” says Weese. Fittingly, it’s another tradition, just like her family’s design legacy, that she is honoring through art. weeserugs.com

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