Surging Surf, an encaustic painting by Erin Rigney, one of the artists featured in Water at the Aspen Chapel Gallery.

1. Get a cool drink of water at the Aspen Chapel Gallery. A new show, titled simply Water, opens today (masks required). Curated by Jocelyn Audette, the exhibit features work from artists Lisa Caplan, Staci Dickerson, Marcia Fusaro, Doug Graybeal, Mary Noone, David Notor, Erin Rigney, Stephanie Parmelee, Michael Raaum, and Audette. It also benefits the Roaring Fork Conservancy, with 10 percent of proceeds from any piece sold going to the river-oriented local nonprofit. You can view and purchase the artwork online, too. Suitably inspired, then sign up for RFC’s Riverscapes: A River Journey Through Art (July 24–27); on your own or with family, create a work of chalk art in a designated space (reserve in advance) outside of the River Center in Basalt. A gallery of pieces created by local teens through a virtual program with the Basalt Library will be on display, too. Aspen Chapel Gallery show runs through August 23

The Parent Trap shows in Snowmass this Thursday and Friday.

2. Head over to Snowmass Village’s first drive-in movie screening. Yes, drive-in movies have become a thing this summer, and Snowmass joins in with showings on select Thursday and Friday evenings, partnering with Aspen Film. This week it’s the 1998 remake of the 1960s classic, The Parent Trap (featuring a young Lindsay Lohan, before she went off the rails). Make sure to play nice while you’re there: stay in your car and leave the alcohol and your dog at home (takeout food and other beverages, especially from Village restaurants, are encouraged). While you’re at it, reserve your parking place for the village’s first drive-in concert, with Trae Pierce and the T-Stones, Thursday, July 23; we’re betting spots will fill up quickly. Snowmass Town Park, lot opens at 8 p.m., movie 9 p.m., free but you must reserve a spot in advance

3. Learn more about critical environmental issues with writer Heather Hansman at Aspen Words’ virtual author talk. Hansman’s recent book, Downriver: Into the Future of Water in the West, uses her trip down the length of the Green River to anchor a discussion of one of our scarcest resources, including future drought, climate change, and policy decisions. She’ll speak with local author and Aspen Words supporter Daniel Shaw about her work, which includes writing for Outside, The Atlantic, Smithsonian, and more. Tuesday, July 21, 5:30­–6:30 p.m., free, register here

The new exhibit Decade by Decade: Aspen Revealed opened at the Wheeler/Stallard Museum this week.

 

4. Time travel through the Aspen Historical Society’s new exhibit Decade by Decade: Aspen Revealed. The new show, which opened yesterday at the Wheeler/Stallard Museum, gives an overview of local history from the 1870s through the 1970s, focusing on Aspen’s place in the historical landscape of the United States. Featuring poignant narratives, historical photographs, and artifacts that showcase the depth of the AHS Collection, the exhibition illustrates stories that shaped the community’s distinct identity and represent the area’s connection to national events and trends. Also now open, the exhibit Maps Through the Decades in the adjacent Archives Building, open Monday­–Friday, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. (please call ahead). Wheeler-Stallard Museum, open Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–noon, vulnerable guests; noon–5 p.m., general public; $10 adults, $8 seniors, free children 18 and under with an adult

5. Support ACES through its Evening on the Lake at Home virtual benefit. Alas, there’s no enchantingly lighted tent, no delicious farm-to-table meal, no romantic canoe rides on Hallam Lake this year—just some of the features that make the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies’ annual fundraiser a summer favorite. But that doesn’t mean you can’t generously give to ACES’ education program and still get a little local flavor in return. Donate at least $1,000 and receive a gift basket containing a new book about Hallam Lake, The Hidden Life Around Us; a selection of Margerum Wines; spirits from Woody Creek Distillers; fresh eggs from ACES’ Rock Bottom Ranch; Colorado mountain honey; and a notebook from Isa Catto Studio. The basket will be delivered to your door or shipped (minus the eggs!).

The goodies you'll get with a generous donation to ACES

 

 

 

 

 

 

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